The Story of One Paper Napkin and a Little Salt

by wildbynature2013

a monthly post
This site is dedicated to helping us attain a Zero Carbon Footprint

Blog: Fast food remnants

How many napkins do I need when I buy take out? Except for the out-of-control messy eater, almost everyone has left over napkins and they’re mostly thrown in the trash.

Do you wonder where that flimsy little thing came from? If you trace a simple paper napkin, you can learn a lot about Man’s relationship with Nature.

Where your tissue comes from? http://wwf.panda.org/how_you_can_help/live_green/fsc/tissue_issues/facts/ It is very likely that your facial and toilet tissues have an element of environmental disaster attached from the Baltics and Russia, or from the eucalyptus forests that replace native peoples and orangoutang habitat.

TJ

Trader Joe’s 100% Recycled

Solution: 1. Always buy your toilet tissue with a high content of recycled paper. 2. Always use hankies over tissue! See In Praise of Hankies, the March 2015 post.

How much paper does one tree produce? 10,000 to 20,000 sheets per tree http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/2014-4-july-august/green-life/how-much-paper-does-one-tree-produce Always buy recycled paper, don’t waste it, and do recycle it! And let’s quit accepting flyers, announcements, and ads from the streets.

angel-tree

At last, the fast food industry is getting greener. No, not because they care but because a smaller napkin saves them money. Either way, the result is the same and they look smarter for it. http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB1020384634341563520

  • take only what you need at the moment.
  • donate the overflow to any group that works with people in need. (Be thoughtful and lie them flat and orderly.)
  • used white napkins are just right for a compost bin.
  • be a trendsetter and BYO.

But that’s not all!

What about the lowly little salt packet?

 

We poo poo the little throw away without a moment of respect. But, salt was once the most coveted substances on earth. There are great salt wars documented as early as the first century BCE. There are Biblical references to salt, and vast empires rose and fell from salt trade along the Silk Road that crossed Asia.

Droitwich Salt Slaves 1215

 

Droitwich Salt Slave, 1215

Horrific stories of slavery are attached to salt mines, even today! http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-sunui-island-south-korea-20150102-story.html Salt empires take turns dominating the world market with salt from the seas and from the earth. It is not insignificant.

So today, 2016, we take that little packet and on occasion use it. Might as well save extra salt, too. You never know, but that small baggie of salt with all those napkins might be a godsend to the person who receives it.

Wild By Nature, Inc.
www.wildbynature.org
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